Personal anecdote

For content relating to personal (non-medical) anecdotes

Impressing the date

My daughter and I were standing on line in an upscale cross-country ski lodge near Sun Valley.  The man in front of us ordered for himself and then his somewhat younger and obviously starstruck female companion. Their order consisted of two hamburgers, two coffees, and two large chocolate-chip cookies, and their bill came to about $30. He handed the guy behind the counter a $100 bill and said, just a bit louder than necessary, “Keep the change.”

Intolerance at the hairdresser

This week, waiting at a local hairdresser for my appointment, I had an unnerving experience.

Two women came in together and sat down. They were talking enthusiastically about the previous night’s State of the State address by Governor Lepage, pleased with how well he spoke and looking forward to some of his promises. At one point, one of the women said: “It’s too bad they won’t let him do what he wants. If they did, he’d get rid of all those Somalis.”

Retirement is like playing Tetris

After four decades in medicine, I retired from the active practice of primary care 15 months ago.  I still get asked at least once a day: “Well, how’s retirement treating you?” My usual reply is that it is a learning process. A more accurate response would be that it is like playing Tetris, but with pieces that change shape and rotate unpredictably as they fall.

(For those not of a certain age, here is Tetris:

Curriculum vitae

This will become a page with my CV when I finish it.

Basic info:

 

Education:

Dartmouth College, BA 1969, German major. Foreign Study in Freiburg, Germany.

Clinical Pharmacology Fellowship, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, July 1971 - June 1972.

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, MD 1974

 

Training:

Family Medicine residency training at the University of Wisconsin Family Practice Department from July 1974 through June 1977.

About me

I am a family physician, now retired from active practice after almost forty years of loving primary care. I am happily married for nearly 4 decades. I have two fantastic grown children with interesting lives - who live too far away - and three of the neatest grandchildren in the world. 

Retirement message to my colleagues

Here is the letter I sent my colleagues upon my retirement from active practice in December 2015.

Wisdom of a centenarian

I made an extra trip to the nursing home to visit him on his hundredth birthday. 

What I learned from a garbage can

My parents never yelled, let alone spanked. We always understood what was expected of us and feared failure rather than punishment. They expressed disappointment far more often than they showed anger. They often asked us to devise our own punishments. And, perhaps above all, they were masters of the object lesson.

Put on your shoes

It was January and there were several inches of fresh snow on the ground and no shoveled path to the car. The temperature in the teens. I had an errand to run with a child who INSISTED on going barefoot.  The following brief conversation between a seriously sleep deprived post-call parent and an articulate three year old. 

“Do you want to put your shoes on yourself, or do you want help?”

"I don't NEED to wear shoes. My feet aren't cold."

"They will be. It's cold out."

"My feet aren't cold."

"Put your shoes on."

"No."

"Fine."

Smart phones. Stupid users.

The small balcony of our motel in Port Angeles afforded me a fine view. Sitting there, I enjoyed spectacular sunsets, a wide range of shore birds, and the ferries coming in and leaving from Victoria across the Strait of Juan de Fuca.

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