Personal anecdote

For content relating to personal (non-medical) anecdotes

Impressing the date

My daughter and I were standing on line in an upscale cross-country ski lodge near Sun Valley.  The man in front of us ordered for himself and then his somewhat younger and obviously starstruck female companion. Their order consisted of two hamburgers, two coffees, and two large chocolate-chip cookies, and their bill came to about $30. He handed the guy behind the counter a $100 bill and said, just a bit louder than necessary, “Keep the change.”

Intolerance at the hairdresser

This week, waiting at a local hairdresser for my appointment, I had an unnerving experience.

Two women came in together and sat down. They were talking enthusiastically about the previous night’s State of the State address by Governor Lepage, pleased with how well he spoke and looking forward to some of his promises. At one point, one of the women said: “It’s too bad they won’t let him do what he wants. If they did, he’d get rid of all those Somalis.”

Retirement is like playing Tetris

After four decades in medicine, I retired from the active practice of primary care 15 months ago.  I still get asked at least once a day: “Well, how’s retirement treating you?” My usual reply is that it is a learning process. A more accurate response would be that it is like playing Tetris, but with pieces that change shape and rotate unpredictably as they fall.

(For those not of a certain age, here is Tetris:

Curriculum vitae

This will become a page with my CV when I finish it.

Basic info:

 

Education:

Dartmouth College, BA 1969, German major. Foreign Study in Freiburg, Germany.

Clinical Pharmacology Fellowship, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, July 1971 - June 1972.

University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, MD 1974

 

Training:

Family Medicine residency training at the University of Wisconsin Family Practice Department from July 1974 through June 1977.

About me

I am a family physician, now retired from active practice after almost forty years of loving primary care. I am happily married for nearly 4 decades. I have two fantastic grown children with interesting lives - who live too far away - and three of the neatest grandchildren in the world. 

Retirement message to my colleagues

Here is the letter I sent my colleagues upon my retirement from active practice in December 2015.

Results are not always the most important thing

Lisl was very good high school skier but seemed not to have the race results she was capable of and everyone expected.  

In practice, it was clear she had great technique and a good motor, and could stay at the front without difficulty. In races, however, she would set out looking fantastic but come in near the end of the pack, beaten by skiers with much less ability than she, and seemed happy with her race.  It never seemed to bother her.  In fact, she never complained and was always one of the happiest in the van on the way home.b

Guiness Book of World Stupid

You can’t make this stuff up. I pulled into our local BJ’s gas station on a recent rainy morning. It was quite busy and I looked around for the shortest line to join, Seeing a woman in her early 20s who appeared to be finished fueling as she re-holstered the nozzle in the pump and returned to her car, I pulled in behind her, expecting to promptly be able to pull up and buy gas.  A car pulled in behind me, so I was now committed.

The postcard relationship

I met Wes when were both counsellors at the same summer camp in Rhinebeck, NY. I had just graduated from high school and he was a graduate student, a gifted musician, and willing to help me find my way through a troublesome summer.

The interview tell

It was the summer before my last year of medical school and I was traveling around the US for family practice residency interviews. My wife and I were staying with some of her college friends while I looked at a program in Denver.

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