Psychology and behavioral economics

For content related to psychology, how we learn, how we make decisions.

Retirement is like playing Tetris

After four decades in medicine, I retired from the active practice of primary care 15 months ago.  I still get asked at least once a day: “Well, how’s retirement treating you?” My usual reply is that it is a learning process. A more accurate response would be that it is like playing Tetris, but with pieces that change shape and rotate unpredictably as they fall.

(For those not of a certain age, here is Tetris:

I teach to remain a learner

Teaching in our local family practice residency is one of the most enjoyable parts of my week. When a colleague recently asked why I liked it so much, it took some reflection to answer.

Have you changed your mind lately?

If not, it doesn't mean you are smart.  Remember...

"Faced with the choice between changing one's mind and proving that there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof."

John Kenneth Galbraith, economist (1908-2006)


 

Confirmation bias

I will never forget the quasi-humorous sign in the radiology reading room:

I’ll see it when I believe it.

Robert Burton, a former Chief of Neurology at Mount Zion Medical Center, explains it this way:

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